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Thursday, January 24, 2019 5:40 - 7:10 pm

Seminar about Zulu divination

African Studies Center - TUFS (ASC-TUFS) and Center for African Area Studies, Kyoto University (CAAS-KU) will hold the 9th TUFS-KU Seminar on January 24, 2019. This is also the 30th ASC Seminar and is jointly organized by Kanto branch of Japan Association for African Studies. We will invite Dr. Yongkyu Chang, a director of Institute of African Studies, Hankuku University of Foreign Studies (IAS-HUFS). He has been staying in Japan as a visiting professor of Graduate School of Asian and African Area Studies, Kyoto University (ASAFAS). Dr. Chang will focus on isangoma, a Zulu diviner, and ukubhula ngathambo, a Zulu divination. He will show its logical process and how divinatory knowledge is constructed by introducing how the divinatory séance is performed. ◆Speaker: Dr. Yongkyu Chang (Visiting Professor, ASAFAS, Kyoto University, Japan / Director, IAS-HUFS, South Korea) ◆Title: "A system of knowledge in action": The Logical Process and Cognitive interpretation of Zulu divination ◆Abstract: The subjects of divination and of diviners have been relatively neglected in the anthropological study of religion when one considers the volume of publication that has been devoted to witchcraft and sorcery. Under this circumstance, divination systems are merely regarded in terms of a process of confirming witchcraft accusation in a broad social and political context. Diviners have also been sidelined in other ways. The derogatory term, witchdoctor, was for too long accepted within the earlier agnostic bias of anthropologists as if witch detecting is the sole mission of the diviner. Consequently, divination systems and diviners are conceived as something illogical and irrational mechanisms and agents of the mystically embedded world. The aim of my presentation is to show the logical process of divination by introducing the divinatory practice of isangoma, a Zulu diviner, who casts amathambo, divining bones, in order to diagnose client's problem. Divining bones are the principal apparatus of divination among Zulu diviners and the logical process of divination is to resolve the disorder caused by various malevolent agents and put this disorder back to the normal. This divination is performed in a unique way by casting divining bones on a divining mat and read the configuration of them. The interpretation of divination is complicating since the divinatory séance is full of symbolism and knowledge which are firmly rooted in the worldview of the Zulu. In this presentation, I am going to introduce a popular Zulu divination, ukubhula ngathambo, and try to interpret the configuration of divination in order to show the unique way of constructing divinatory knowledge. ◆Keywords: Amathambo, Divination, Divinatory knowledge, Isangoma, Symbolism, The Zulu, Ukubhula ngathambo ◆Date & Time: Thursday, January 24, 2019 5:40 - 7:10 pm ◆Venue: Room 102, Research and Lecture Building, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies ◆Language: English ◆Admission: Free ◆No pre-registration is needed. ◆Jointly organized by African Studies Center - TUFS, the Center for African Area Studies - Kyoto University, and Kanto branch of Japan Association for African Studies
京大との共同セミナーでズールーの卜占を考察します
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 5:40 - 7:10 pm

Seminar about Ghana's economic

African Studies Center - TUFS will hold the 29th ASC Seminar, inviting Dr. Naaborle Sackeyfio from Miami University. It is jointly organized by Kanto branch of Japan Association for African Studies. Dr. Sackeyfio will broadly explore economic ties between Ghana and Japan as well as China's pivot to Ghana, and suggest the critical importance for Ghana to protect its agency and to learn from Japan's trajectory for its economic ascendancy and sustainable development. ◆Speaker: Dr. Naaborle Sackeyfio (Assistant Professor, Department of Global and Intercultural Studies, Miami University) ◆Title: Negotiating power and agency in Ghana's Asian nexus ◆Abstract: Frequently touted for its stellar credentials grounded in stable democratic governance and a robust track record of development, Ghana courts its growing status as one of the fastest growing economies. This lecture broadly explores economic ties between Ghana and Japan as well as China's pivot to Ghana. I examine lucrative partnerships with China to argue that Ghana's ascendance will depend on how well it protects its agency in an era where 'runaway' development and resource politics may imperil Ghana's promise in the 21st century. In addition, I contend that despite the difficulty of replication, Japan's trajectory offers potent institutional lessons that augur well for Ghana's sustainable development. ◆Date & Time: Tuesday, January 15, 2019 5:40 - 7:10 pm ◆Venue: Room 104, Research and Lecture Building, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies ◆Language: English ◆Admission: Free ◆No pre-registration is needed. ◆Jointly organized by Kanto branch of Japan Association for African Studies
ガーナの経済に関するセミナーを開催
Wednesday, January 9, 2019 4:00 - 5:30 pm

Seminar about PKOs in Africa

African Studies Center - TUFS will hold the 28th ASC Seminar about peacekeeping operations in Africa. We will invite two speaker, Mr. Masatomo Yamaguchi, DDR Officer, UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA), and Ms. Hinata Imai from TUFS. This is jointly organized by Kanto branch of Japan Association for African Studies. ◆Theme: New Development of Security Governance in Africa ◆Program: 4:00 - 4:30 pmUN Peacekeeping Operations in 'new' operational environment: Experience from MINUSMAMasatomo Yamaguchi (DDR Officer, UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali <MINUSMA>) 4:30 - 5:00 pmPrinciple of Subsidiarity in the context of African Peace and Security Architecture: The Evolution of African Peace Operations and the Standby ForceHinata Imai (PhD Candidate, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies) 5:00 - 5:30 pmDiscussion *Please click the titles to see each abstract. ◆Date & Time: Wednesday, January 9, 2019 4:00 - 5:30 pm ◆Venue: Room 111, Research and Lecture Building, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies ◆Language: English ◆Admission: Free ◆No pre-registration is needed. ◆Jointly organized by Kanto branch of Japan Association for African Studies
アフリカでの平和維持活動に関するセミナー開催
Friday, December 21, 2018 5:40 pm - 7:10 pm

Seminar about British Film "Zulu"

African Studies Center - TUFS will hold the 27th ASC Seminar onDecember 21, 2018. The speaker is Dr. Gairoonisa Paleker, our visiting professor. She is a senior lecturer of Department of Historical and Heritage Studies, University of Pretoria in South Africa. As a specialist of history and film studies, she will explore the digital afterlife of the British film Zulu (1964) which is a filmic representation of the battle between the British and the Zulu at Rorke's Drift in 1879. The film has been shown in various media, including You Tube, which have constituted the digital afterlife of the film. Dr. Paleker will explore what this digital afterlife means for the discipline of history. ◆Title: New Media, New History?: Some reflections on Zulu and its afterlife in historical studies ◆Speaker: Dr. Gairoonisa Paleker (Visiting Professor, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies / Senior Lecturer, University of Pretoria) ◆Abstract:This presentation explores the digital afterlife of the British film Zulu (1964) which is a filmic representation of the battle between the British and the Zulu at Rorke's Drift in 1879; in particular the article, on which this presentation is based, seeks to engage with what this digital afterlife means for the discipline of history more broadly, but more specifically the 'historium sanctum' of the discipline, namely, the archive. Or, following Andrew Hoskins' (2011) borrowing of Chris Anderson's concept of the 'long tail', this article considers the ways in which new digital media revitalise and repackage the past for consumption by a new category of 'prosumers' (Hoskins, 2011). The long tail and digital afterlife of the film is constituted through periodic public screenings of the film in British cinemas, on British television, by military enthusiast and fans of the film such as Henry Coleman who set up zulufilmstore.com, a website dedicated to the film. Apart from these, YouTube is another significant contributor to the film's afterlife. While YouTube does not provide access to the film in its entirety, it provides several clips and the ubiquitous comments from visitors. Collectively, these are the primary sources of this research and thus, the digital archive comprised of both 'specialist' knowledge and information as well as 'popular' commentary and opinions. Within this framing, the article is an exploratory engagement with the concept of the digital archive, public and professional history and its implication for the discipline of history. ◆Date & Time: Friday, December 21, 2018 5:40 pm - 7:10 pm ◆Venue: Room 322, Research and Lecture Building, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies ◆Language: English ◆Admission: Free ◆No pre-registration is needed.
映画「ズールー戦争」に関するセミナー開催決定

ActivitiesActivity records of ASC

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【The 27th ASC Seminar】New Media, New History?: Some reflections on Zulu and its afterlife in historical studies

Friday, December 21, 2018 5:40 pm - 7:10 pm
Date & Time: Friday, December 21, 2018 5:40 pm - 7:10 pm Venue: Room 322, Research and Lecture Building, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies Speaker: Dr. Gairoonisa Paleker(Visiting Professor, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies / Senior Lecturer, University of Pretoria) Theme: New Media, New History?: Some reflections on Zulu and its afterlife in historical studies Report: Dr. Gairoonisa Paleker, a visiting Professor from University of Pretoria, delivered a lecture titled: "New Media, New History? Some Reflections on Zulu and Its Afterlife in Historical Studies." Dr. Paleker in her introduction specified that, film in historical studies is approached in two important ways, which are (1) Film as a historical source-which is readily accepted by historians and (2) Film as history-which is hardly accepted by historians. Dr. Paleker highlighted a few criticisms of film considered as history, and they are: film do not represent the complexity of the past; films individualize and romanticize the past; films are subjective and emotive and finally, films are unable to depict details and debate among historians. Moreover, Dr. Paleker said, her research focuses on Zulu (1964) as both primary source and historical text. As a primary source, she indicated that from her perspective, Zulu is read for information about the context of production and context of reception, which means that, Zulu in history as providing information about the social and political concerns of the period of production and reception. Similarly, as a historical text, she read Zulu for the multiple historical meanings that have been created and re-created in its 54 years history, which also means that, Zulu as history, as visual text representing aspect of the past. Coalescing these two perspectives, Dr. Paleker posed a rhetorical question, what this film, and its very long afterlife on both conventional and new media platforms means for the discipline of history? Dr. Paleker concisely recounted the historical battle that ensued between the Zulu Warriors and the British, and its historical importance in film production. She said approximately 400 Zulu warriors march on the mission station "Rorke Drift," and the plot of the film focuses on this encounter between the small British contingent and the numerically superior Zulu force, an encounter that eventually gave the British success in repelling the Zulu force and retaking Rorke Drift. She said the scene ended with the Zulu force singing a song in praise of British Valour, while at the same time, the British responded with the Welsh Marching song concurrently. Dr. Paleker said this film was first premiered in 1964 and screened at the Plaza Cinema in London. She also stated that a turn in the millennium poll conducted by the British institute in 1999, placed Zulu at 31 out of the 100 greatest British films of the twentieth century. Concluding, Dr. Paleker emphasized that, the proliferation of mass digital media not only contributes to the long tail of this film, but in each viewing, each generation of viewers becomes a "prosumer" of history (Producer and consumer). She asserted that, the new history which is enabled by new media has numerous implications on five C's, which are: context, causality, contingency, complexity and Change over time.
Events
【The 27th ASC Seminar】New Media, New History?: Some reflections on Zulu and its afterlife in historical studies

Seminar at Kyoto University

Tuesday, December 18, 2018 3:00-5:00 pm
Dr. Mabutho Shangase had a lecture at 8th KU-TUFS Seminar at Kyoto University. The seminar was jointly organized by Center for African Area Studies (CAAS), Kyoto University and African Studies Center, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies (ASC - TUFS). At the seminar, Dr. Shangase talked about exercise of state autonomy to achieve macro-economic stability and effect incremental policy change in South Africa between 1994 and 2014. He explained the movement of South Africa in this period by using the three elements comprising conjunctual state autonomy: the historical context, the prevailing neoliberal paradigm, as well as a professional bureaucracy.
Visiting Researchers
京都大学でセミナー開催(86th KUASS / 8th KU-TUFS Seminar)

【The 26th ASC Seminar】Human Security, Peace Building and State Building in Peace Missions: Dilemmas and Lessons Learned From Africa

Monday, December 10, 2018 5:40 pm - 7:10 pm
Date & Time: Monday, December 10, 2018 5:40 pm - 7:10 pm Venue: Room 211, Research and Lecture Building, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies Speaker: Professor Owen Greene(Professor, Peace Studies and International Development, University of Bradford, UK) Theme: Human Security, Peace Building and State Building in Peace Missions: Dilemmas and Lessons Learned from Africa Report: Peace Studies and International Development Professor, from University of Bradford, United Kingdom, on invitation by African Studies Center delivered a public lecture on the theme: "Human Security, Peace Building and State-Building in Peace Missions: Dilemma and Lessons from Africa." Professor Owen Greene expounded that the end of Cold War saw the emergence of many intractable intra-state wars across many countries, but largely in the post independent African states. He stated that most of those countries were confronted with fragility related complications, such as profound division and corruption; weak state institutions; low security protection for population, low resilience to shocks and incoherent economic governance system, lack of rule of law, low access to fair, legitimate and dispute settlement, and most importantly, the prevalence of societal cleavages within the context of weak national identity or solidarity. Professor Owen Greene emphasized that the emergence of peacebuilding, state building and human security in conflict and post conflict countries, are intended to strengthen national capacities at all levels for conflict management, resolution and reconciliation, and to lay solid foundation for sustainable peace, development. In the same context, he added that, these approaches will help to build or rebuild institutions of government that guarantees peaceful values, that respect human rights, rule of law and security, and improve on the political process. However, Professor Owen Greene also specified that, there have been substantial lessons learned from conflict and post conflict interventions and on state building efforts in fragile states. These lessons according Professor Owen Greene includes: the understanding that the drivers of fragility are typically powerful and difficult to overcome; that the ongoing piecemeal initiatives are challenging to sustain; that the plausible progress at local level are not solid to scale up or even be sustained; and ultimately, that post conflict peacebuilding requires long term effort by critical mass of elites. With the emerged tensions in peacebuilding, state building and human security missions in conflict affected areas, Professor Owen Greene emphasizes on peacebuilding to begin somewhere in-between the top-down and bottom-up, otherwise known as "community security building." Professor Owen Greene stated that, this approach is a people-centred approach that addresses insecurity and integrates human security, development and state building paradigms. This approach, according to the Professor, is supposed to work in bringing a wide range of state and civil society actors from the security demands and supply sides to identify the root causes of insecurity collectively, and to develops coordinated response to them. In conclusion, Professor Owen Greene reiterated that, such paradigm will build on the capacity and willingness of communities, as well as helps societies with wider reforms that can guarantees people-focused policies, at sub-national and national levels.
Events
【The 26th ASC Seminar】Human Security, Peace Building and State Building in Peace Missions: Dilemmas and Lessons Learned From Africa

【The 25th ASC Seminar】Inter-basin water transfer: From the Congo basin to Lake Chad: Challenges and opportunities

Thursday, December 6, 2018 5:40 pm - 7:10 pm
Date & Time: Thursday, December 6, 2018 5:40 pm - 7:10 pm Venue: Room 317, Research and Lecture Building, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies Speaker: Dr. Raymond Lumbuenamo(Professor, University of Kinshasa and Unesco Regional School of Tropical Forest and Land Management (ERAIFT) / Senior Natural Resources Management Specialist, World Bank) Theme: Inter-basin water transfer: From the Congo basin to Lake Chad: Challenges and opportunities Report: Professor Raymond Lumbuenamo, of the University of Kinshasa and UNESCO Regional School of Tropical Forest and Land Management and, a Senior Natural Resources Management Specialist of the World Bank, on the invitation by the Africa Studies Center at the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, delivered a public lecture on the theme: "Inter-Basin Water Transfer: From the Congo Basin to Lake Chad, Challenges and Opportunities." In his opening statement, Professor Lumbuenamo expatiated that over the past 50 years, the Lake Chad has lost 90 percent of its waters. He also referenced Sub-Saharan Africa generally that, of the 800 million people, 300 million live in a water stressed environment. As regards the Lake Chad crisis, Professor Lumbuenamo allotted the cause of its occurrence on two factors. On the natural cause, he stated that desert advancement and climate change has impacted notably on prolonged drought and declining rainfall since 1973. On other hand, the human cause which he termed "Anthropogenic Causes," emanate from each riparian country deciding unilaterally to build dams on rivers that feed the lake and diverting water away, which has resulted into over 50 percent of the lake waters been diverted. For example, he mentioned that, Chari-Logoe River which contributes to more than 80 percent of the Lake Chad water, was drastically altered after Chad built dams and dikes on the Logon in 1970 and diverted two third of its waters; Nigeria built three dams and is planning a fourth on the Komadugu-Yode River Basin which contributes two and half percent of the Lake Chad water, and Nigeria also built dam on the Yedsaram-Ngadda River in Borno. Professor Lumbuenamo identifies Cameroon, Niger, Central African Republican (CAR), Chad and Nigeria as the main actors leading to these brewing crisis, with each having an appreciable proportion of access to the territory in question. Amidst the aforementioned, Professor Lumbuenamo asserted that, there is a growing consensus that Sahel is re-greening compared to the 1980s and this trend is due to the increase in rainfall in the region. He also mentioned about the Lake Chad replenishment project called the "Transaqua Project," which was meant to build a 2400 km canal to collect five percent of the waters of northern tributaries of the Congo River, fifty to hundred billion cubic meters of water per year to restore Lake Chad to its original surface, as well as ends desertification, develop agriculture in the region and generates substantial amount of hydropower. However, Professor characterized it as part of a series of dams and a continuous channel dug at constant attitude. In his conclusion, he mentioned that the question of transferring water from the Ubangi to the lake Chad must take into account the maintenance of the Congo Basin Forest Cover, the biodiversity of the Congo River and its tributaries, the decrease in the amplitude of the water flow variation, the preservation of peatlands, the inland waterways and the welfare of the residents, etc. He therefore, suggested the solar option which would not require a dam construction and therefore will not generate flooding, low environmental hard, cost effective in solar panel installations, no displacement, 3000km2 of water surface of Lake Chad will be installed in a year and the cost for the installation of the solar panels would be much more less than the Transaqua's cost.
Events
【The 25th ASC Seminar】Inter-basin water transfer: From the Congo basin to Lake Chad: Challenges and opportunities