List of Subjects in English

School of Language and Culture Studies

 

 

l  Introductory Subjects

l  Survey Subjects

l  Elective Subjects

 

 

 

l  Introductory Subjects

言語研究入門B/A

211007 / 211302G / 5005

Introduction to Morpho-syntactic and Semantic Typology

河内 一博

KAWACHI Kazuhiro

Winter

集中

Intensive

Students will develop their skills in analyzing and describing morpho-syntactic and semantic structures in various languages from a theory-neutral and typological perspective. In class, we will go over introductory papers and do exercises. The students are strongly encouraged to actively participate in class.

 

グローバルコミュニケーション研究入門A/B

212002 / 212305G / 5017

Introduction to Intercultural Communication and Language Education

キャラカー

CARAKER, Richard

Spring

2

Fri. 2

All lectures will be conducted in English, and will provide an overview of intercultural communication and well as practical experience in ethnographic research. Students will analyze cultures through lectures, weekly readings, submitting written answers to questions based on lectures and readings, and participating in small group discussions.

 

グローバルコミュニケーション研究入門B/A

212005 / 212302G / 5122

Introduction to Japanese Language Education in the Era of Globalization

櫻井 勇介

SAKURAI Yusuke

Fall

5

Tue. 5

This course introduces and develops the knowledge required by teachers of Japanese language as a foreign language. The course exclusively focuses on the settings of teaching and learning Japanese abroad. The course also emphasises students’ development of various transferable skills which are necessary in the current globalised and still further globalising world.

The students are expected to proactively research the contexts and situations where Japanese language teaching and learning are taking place, to analyse major issues in the area which they are interested in, and to present their research outcomes effectively to the other members of the class.

The students will engage in many group work activities. By so doing, the course aims to raise their awareness of their skills and attitude which are substantially important to effectively work and communicate with individuals and groups from different backgrounds. As such, this course is not only designed to provide the students with a depth of knowledge, but also a range of skills which prepare them for the era of the globalization.

 

グローバルコミュニケーション研究入門B/A

212003 / 212306G / 5045

Introduction to Interpreting: Theory and Practice

田村 智子

TAMURA Tomoko

集中

集中

Intensive

This is a highly intensive workshop of actual interpreting practice (both Japanese-to-English and English-to-Japanese).  Interpreting and translation “theories” will only start making any sense after encountering various “interpreting and translation” issues through actual “practice” and experience.  This introductory course, therefore, will focus on having the students do a lot of interpreting activities using various live talks and recorded materials, through which they will try to start building their own “experience-based” theories.  Though no prior knowledge on or experience in interpreting is a prerequisite, for a very practical reason, the “minimum” required language proficiency will be set as shown in “Notes” below.

 

総合文化研究入門A/B

213002 / 213305G / 4032

Introduction to Contemporary Japanese Culture

堀口 佐知子

HORIGUCHI Sachiko

Spring

5

Tue. 5

We will explore various aspects of Japanese society and culture in English, through engaging with academic and non-academic works written in English on Japan.

 

総合文化研究入門A/B

213006 / 213306G / 4027

Introduction to Religious Studies

丸山 空大

MARUYAMA Takao

Spring

2

Fri. 2

The course is held in English, while we use both English and Japanese reading material. Students are required to make a certain contribution: to make a (group-)presentation, to speak actively in discussion and to help lecturer and other students.

 

Lecture: Lecturer explains major methodologies in religious studies, based on assigned texts or movies.

 

(Group-)presentation: Students form groups and make a presentation (20 minutes). 10 minutes discussion will follow each presentation.

 

総合文化研究入門B/A

213004 / 213302G / 6130

Introduction to Lyric Poetry: A Close Reading

マキン

MACKIN, Zane

Fall

5

Tue. 5

Like an experimental aircraft testing the limits of flight, poetry tests the limits of language and what

it can do. And, as a science in linguistic extremes, the study of poetry comes with its own technical

language. What is a sonnet? A ballad? What are iambs, dactyls, pentameters, hendecasyllables,

alexandrines? How does blank verse differ from free verse? And what of rhetorical techniques, like

alliteration, enjambement, chiasmus, tmesis, allegory, ekphrasis, and anadiplosis (aka. coblas

capfinidas)? Those wishing to better understand what makes a poem soar will master this

metalanguage in class. Furthermore, we will constantly employ this language in our readings, which

will be by definition close, analytical, and deeply critical.

Classes will generally consist of a short introductory lecture followed by group analysis of selected

poems. The course will require a considerable commitment of both time and intellectual energy.

Students are expected to come to class having read the texts thoroughly, and must be prepared to

criticize and question the texts under study. In addition, each student will present once on a poet of

choice. Finally, students will perform frequent live readings in class.

There are no midterms and finals in this course. Instead, students will turn in 6 short (1-2 page)

reader response essays every two weeks. The purpose of the essays is to confirm adequate study of

the texts, and to help nurture critical thinking and writing skills in English. Topics will often be

provided by the professor.

This class also encourages students to try their hand at writing original poetry themselves. Students

are permitted to write poems formally imitative of our readings instead of the bimonthly reader

response essays. In week 14, all students are required to write an original poem, modeled after the

formal style of a poet in our readings, and in week 15, students will translate, into English, a poem

originally written in another language.

Advanced English is required for this class

 

l  Survey Subjects

言語学概論A/B

311002 / 311305G / 5015

Survey of Language and Society 1

ウィンチェスター

WINCHESTER, Mark

Spring

1

Thu. 1

At the beginning of the semester students will form study groups that will work together in class on the assigned texts throughout the course. The course will be split into two parts. In part one we will read and discuss the Japanese writer Mizumura Minae’s 2008 bestseller, The Fall of the Japanese Language in the Age of English. From this reading we will discuss the challenges facing the Japanese language in the contemporary world, with a particular emphasis on language education. In part two of the course we will examine the following topics: loan words, hybrid languages, dialect language and the media, language and ideology, translation, Korean, the Ainu language, and gender.

Course Format: One session per week, including seminars, group worksheets, mini-lectures and film presentations. Preparation and participation in group and seminar discussions is compulsory.

Core Texts: A wide variety of sources will be drawn upon. The core text will be:

水村美苗『日本語が亡びるとき』筑摩書房、2008年。

**文庫版、ちくま文庫、2015年。

Minae Mizumura, The Fall of Language in an Age of English, Columbia University Press, 2015.

 

言語学概論B/A

311006 / 311302G / 5016

Survey of Language and Society 2

ウィンチェスター

WINCHESTER, Mark

Fall

1

Thu. 1

language user interfaces, such as SIRI.

Course Format: One session per week, including seminars, group worksheets, mini-lectures and film presentations. Preparation and participation in group and seminar discussions is compulsory.

Core Texts: A wide variety of sources will be drawn upon. The readings for each week will be made available to students as PDFs via the TUFS online system.

The core texts will be:

David Crystal, Txtng: the gr8 db8, Oxford University Press, 2008.

David Crystal, Internet Linguistics: A Student Guide, Routledge, 2011.

 

多言語・多文化社会論概論B/A

312114 / 312313G

Survey of Japanese Diaspora

土田 久美子

TSUCHIDA Kumiko

Fall

3

Fri. 3

Today, Japan has become a destination for many migrants. Through history, however, it has also sent out many migrants to various part of the world, including North and South America and Asia. This course investigate this phenomenon of international migration in Japanese political and social context. While discussing some of the scholarly writings and documentary films on the subject, we will be asking pertinent questions such as: How does international migration occur in Japan? What is its socio-political process? What does the term “Japanese/Nikkei” mean to the Japanese immigrants and their descendants in Japan and abroad? We will consider these questions and more, and examine the lives of Nikkei of the past and present, in and out of Japan.

 

文化・文学概論A/B

313004 / 313306G / 6142

Survey of Western Literature 1

マキン

MACKIN, Zane

Spring

4

Tue. 4

The first semester of this year-long course will be divided into three time periods and places: 1) the birth of literature in the ancient near east; 2) Greece and the origin of “Western Literature”; 3) Rome and the reiteration of the tradition in a new language and sociopolitical context.

 

Our view of literature will be genealogical: texts influence those that follow them, while new works pay homage to, comment on, and critique those that precede them. We will pay special attention to literature’s relationship to its origins: the civilized reflection on the primitive, the domesticated on the wild, the rational on the emotional, and the familiar on the exotic.

 

The course is reading and writing-intensive (in English) and will require a substantial commitment of both time and intellectual energy. Students are expected to come to class having read the texts thoroughly, and must be prepared to criticize and question the texts under study. Note that the grading structure of this course rewards those who keep up with the readings and actively participate.

 

文化・文学概論B/A

313003 / 313303G / 6224

Survey of HAIKU and Japanese HAIKU

菅長 理恵

SUGANAGA Rie

Fall

3

Wed. 3

Lecture, reading the materials and discussion in the group

active learning

 

文化・文学概論B/A

313005 / 313304G / 6144

Survey of Western Literature 2

マキン

MACKIN, Zane

Fall

4

Tue. 4

The course is reading and writing-intensive (in English) and will require commitment of both time and intellectual energy. Although the quantity of reading is not excessive, the texts are not easy, and they will require close and careful study. Because the class combines student-led discussion with lectures, it is mandatory that students complete the readings, and be prepared to discuss them in class.

 

There are no midterms and finals in this course. Instead, students will turn in 6 short (1-2 page) reader response essays every two weeks. The purpose of the essays is to confirm adequate study of the texts, and to help nurture critical thinking and writing skills in English.

 

At the end of the semester, students will turn in a review of a film based on one of the works discussed in class, and will complete an active learning project.

 

思想文化概論B/A

313011 / 313308G / 6008

Survey of Japanese Mythology

松村 一男

MATSUMURA Kazuo

Fall

5

Mon. 5

Japanese Mythology, mainly of the Kojiki, will be explained by stages. Influence from neighboring countries will be noted. Structural analysis will be shown.

The Kojiki text for the class can be reached through internet.

Students will give a presentation and submit a term paper on that topic.

 

南アジア文化概論B/A

313024 / 313322G / 6106

Survey of Bengali Culture

チョックロボルティ

CHAKRABORTY, Amitava

Fall

5

Thu. 5

This course offers general introduction to the tradition of Bengali Culture, one of the major cultures of Asia. Further, in-depth introduction to a few contemporary trends will be offered.

 

文化・文学概論B/A

313027 / 313327G / 6253

Survey of Literary Theory

逆井 聡人

SAKASAI Akito

Fall

3

Fri. 3

There has been a tectonic shift in the arena of literary studies in progress from a European-oriented discipline to a truly global perspective. Today, we encounter a great number of literary works written in a variety of languages, and for this reason, we need theoretical and methodological tools to read and appreciate such diverse literatures more horizontally.

 In the first half of this course, we will learn how to use these analytical tools through an overview of issues debated by literary theorists. In the latter half, we will learn how to confront the diversity and peculiarity of literary texts. We will sort out what we learned through two exams, as well as apply theoretical methodologies to our own readings in two reports for active learning sessions, in addition to a final essay.

 

 

 

 

 

l  Elective Subjects

言語学A

411002 / 5003

Linguistics: Fundamentals of Syntax

林 龍次郎

HAYASHI Ryujiro

Spring

2

Thu. 2

Basic principles of syntax (sentence structure) will be introduced and discussed. Examples will be mostly from English. Each week the class consists of a lecture, an exercise, and discussion.

 

言語教育学研究A

412023 / 5121

Second Language Acquisition 1: Introduction to Second Language Acquisition

ハウザー

HAUSER, Eric

Spring

6

Thu. 6

As this is an introductory course, it will cover a broad range of topics in SLA. Students will learn about these through readings and lectures and will be tested on what they have learned.

 

コミュニケーション論A

412033

Communication Intelligence (C-IQ) 1

カセラス

KARSERAS, Annette

Spring

4

Mon. 4

This course uses the A-S-K (Awareness-Skills-Knowledge) approach and EQ-SQ-CQ-GQ model. It develops Students ability to communicate using presentation and dialogue skills suitable for different cultures.

 

通訳・翻訳論A

412037

English Through Mass Media (Spring)

鶴田 知佳子

TSURUTA Chikako

Spring

4

Mon. 4

Newspaper articles written in English will be used as the basis for discussion together with a textbook: Diversity in Japan A Reader, by Pamela Uchida and Deborah Iwabuchi, published from Kinseido.

 

通訳・翻訳論A

412043 / 5110

Translation and Interpreting Studies (Spring)

田村 智子

TAMURA Tomoko

Spring

6

Wed. 6

This is a “hands-on” interpreting and translation workshop, with a primary focus on the improvement of “on-the-spot” instantaneous oral translation of various types of discourse (recorded and live).  The students are also expected to gain theoretical understanding of what “translation” is or should be.  Before registration, please check “Registration Requirements” in “Notes” below carefully.

 

実践英語A

412053

Business English for Interpreters/Translators (Spring)

ロザリオ

Del ROSARIO, Paul

Spring

3

Wed. 3

In this course, students will exercise their English language skills through common business situations.  Students will be required to engage in a variety of in-class discussions, some role-playing activities (speaking & listening), as well as out-of-class reading & writing assignments.  This course spends a great deal of time for paired, small group, and whole class discussions, so participation is crucial.

 

実践英語A

412054

Public Speaking for Interpreters/Translators (Spring)

石黒 弓美子

ISHIGURO Yumiko

Spring

2

Fri. 2

1.Defining and practicing public speaking.

2.Defining and practicing critical thinking.

3.Peer review: We will learn the

 

実践英語A

412055

English Debate for Interpreters/Translators (Spring)

リッチー

RITCHIE, Zane

Spring

3

Tue. 3

 

In this course you will examine some contentious issues both in Japan and elsewhere, with the purpose to encourage critical analysis, discussion and debate. You will learn how take a clear stance on an issue and to better express yourself in a logical, polite, and coherent manner.

 

言語教育学研究B

412024 / 5123

Second Language Acquisition 2: Conversation Analysis for Second Language Acquisition

ハウザー

HAUSER, Eric

Fall

6

Thu. 6

There will first be an introduction to Conversation Analysis (CA) and CA-SLA. This will involve a mixture of lecture and discussion of readings. Students will then learn the basics of CA transcription and will record, transcribe, and analyze some second language data. Finally, students will use the data they have transcribed to conduct a research project, which they will present on.

 

言語教育学研究B

412025

Psycholinguistics of Native and Non-native Language Use

マシューズ

MATTHEWS, John

Fall

2

Tue. 2

Psycholinguistics examines the mental processes involved in the comprehension and production of language. Beginning with an idea in a speaker’s mind, we will follow the sequence of steps required to encode the idea into language, to utter the chosen words in speech, to analyze the characteristics of the sound produced by a human voice, to decode the speech signal into a corresponding representation in language, and finally to interpret the intended meaning in a specific communicative event. At each step along the sequence, we will first examine what mechanisms operate in the normal processing of language by adult native speakers, then consider how children might come to attain proficiency with those mechanisms, then determine how the development of such processing mechanisms might be influenced by already knowing a language (as occurs, for example, when adults learn a second language), and finally investigate whether special mechanisms must develop for the regular use two or more languages among bilinguals.

 

言語教育学研究B

412026

Research Methodology for Language Education Studies

イリチュ

IRIC, Peter

Fall

3

Thu. 3

This course will cover research methodologies with a particular focus on language education (e.g., language learning, language teaching). It will address the “what” and “how” of research, by providing students with research skills invaluable in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of research. Students will learn about various kinds of research, from small-scale case studies to large-scale experiments. In addition, the course will help students develop critical, analytical skills which will enable them to read and evaluate published research in an informed manner, identifying research problems and questions. In this course, we will cover both quantitative and qualitative research methods. It will be helpful to students who are in the process of designing their own projects, such as course projects or senior theses.

 

コミュニケーション論B

412034

Communication Intelligence (C-IQ) 2

カセラス

KARSERAS, Annette

Fall

4

Mon. 4

This course uses the A-S-K (Awareness-Skills-Knowledge) approach and EQ-SQ-CQ-GQ model. It develops Students ability to communicate using presentation and dialogue skills suitable for different cultures.

 

通訳・翻訳論B

412044

English Through Mass Media (Fall)

鶴田 知佳子

TSURUTA Chikako

Fall

4

Mon. 4

Newspaper articles written in English will be used as the basis for discussion together with a textbook

 

通訳・翻訳論B

412049 / 5111

Translation and Interpreting Studies (Fall)

田村 智子

TAMURA Tomoko

Fall

6

Wed. 6

This is a “hands-on” interpreting and translation workshop, with a primary focus on the improvement of “on-the-spot” instantaneous oral translation of various types of discourse (recorded and live).  The students are also expected to gain theoretical understanding of what “translation” is or should be.  Before registration, please check “Registration Requirements” in “Notes” below carefully.

 

実践英語B

412057

Business English for Interpreters/Translators (Fall)

ロザリオ

Del ROSARIO, Paul

Fall

3

Wed. 3

In this course, students will exercise their English language skills through common business situations.  Students will be required to engage in a variety of in-class discussions, some role-playing activities (speaking & listening), as well as out-of-class reading & writing assignments.  This course spends a great deal of time for paired, small group, and whole class discussions, so participation is crucial.

 

実践英語B

412058

Public Speaking for Interpreters/Translators (Fall)

石黒 弓美子

ISHIGURO Yumiko

Fall

2

Fri. 2

Utilizing what we have learned in the previous term, we will be practicing giving speeches with the aims of providing information and persuasion. Also we will learn more effective methods for short speeches and effectiveness of delivery.

 

実践英語B

412059

English Debate for Interpreters/Translators (Fall)

リッチー

RITCHIE, Zane

Fall

3

Tue. 3

n this course you will examine some contentious issues both in Japan and elsewhere, with the purpose to encourage critical analysis, discussion and debate. You will learn how take a clear stance on an issue and to better express yourself in a logical, polite, and coherent manner.

 

文化・文学研究A

413001 / 6141

Japanese Performative Culture

小野 五弥子

ONO Sayako

Spring

3

Thu. 3

The course will introduce the anthropological perspective on performing arts and Japanese culture. The class will discuss key performative aspects including the body, gender and art in Japan, highlighting localised and globalised performances in Japan.

 

ヨーロッパ文化研究A

413007 / 6165

Central European Emigration and Samizdat Literature

ゲプハルトヴァー

GEBHARTOVA, Marketa

Spring

5

Tue. 5

This course will introduce the cultural history, represented mainly by literature and films, authored by Central and East  European exiled/samizdat authors of the second half of the 20th century.

 

アメリカ文化研究A

413040 / 6173

African American Literature 1

石川 千暁

ISHIKAWA Chiaki

Spring

3

Fri. 3

Sula (1973) is a critically acclaimed novel written by African American author Toni Morrison, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1993. It narrates a story about two girl friends in a black community, Sula and Nel, who become attached to each other during adolescent years and later grow apart. Their separation becomes final when Nel discovers that Sula slept with her husband. Is there a way to recover friendship after such a betrayal? Or is it really a betrayal? What message does Morrison convey about female friendship? Through discussions on this painful but beautiful novel, we will 1) note how (positively) blackness is portrayed and 2) expand our views on various topics including trauma, death, identity for women, sexual and non-sexual bonds, and the mother-daughter relationship.

 

The class will be divided into small groups, so that the students can comfortably share their opinions, questions, and concerns in English. To warm up, discussion leaders will first make a short presentation on the assigned text so that other students can start making comments and asking questions. To further facilitate the discussion, the students will be allowed to speak in Japanese during the last 30 minutes of each class.

 

南アジア文化研究A

413098 / 6211

Bengali Literature

チョックロボルティ

CHAKRABORTY, Amitava

Spring

5

Thu. 5

This course offers general introduction to the tradition of Bengali Literature, one of the major literature of Asia. Further, in-depth introduction to a few contemporary trends, Feminist, Postmodernist and LGBT writings, will be offered.

 

文化・文学研究A

413136

Tokyo-Taipei Distance Learning 1

カセラス

KARSERAS, Annette

Spring

3

Mon. 3

Overview

This course uses cross-cultural distance learning human-and-computer technology. It begins with the A-S-K (Awareness-Skills-Knowledge) approach and EQ-SQ-CQ-GQ model. It also describes culture and personality using dimensions and orientations (high-low context, high-low power distance, individualism-collectivism, expressive-reserved, introversion-extroversion, etc).

 

Students research local, every-day ‘emics’ that shed light on objects and concepts that are culturally-specific to modern Tokyo and Tamkang. Students also research STEEP global challenges (Social, Technological, Economic, Environmental, Political) using global data indexes and explore reactions and Caizen opportunities with CCDL partners. This CCDL course aims create an enjoyable working and living socio-physical environment -- within-and-between local, international and global systems -- in the present moment (imminence) and longterm future (infinity).

 

文化・文学研究A

413168 / 6254

Comparing East Asian Modern Literature

逆井 聡人

SAKASAI Akito

Spring

3

Fri. 3

In this lecture, we will read representative novels of modern East Asia, including Korea, China, Taiwan and Japan. While we will look at individual concerns of each text, we will also understand shared themes among novels in a same period. By doing so, we will try to have interpretations beyond borders of nation-states.

 

日本文化研究A(日本文学1

413171

Modern and Contemporary Japanese Literature 1

セン

SEN Raj Lakhi

Spring

3

Thu. 3

This course examines the English translations of Japanese literary text such as manifestos, essays, novels, first-person fiction, poetry, women novels and colonial literature  written from Meiji Era to present day literature. By brainstorming various discourses arising from the long accumulated research on the aforesaid topics, students will be able see through and understand the modern and contemporary Japanese literature, society and culture.

 

アメリカ文化研究B

413013 / 6143

African American Literature 2

石川 千暁

ISHIKAWA Chiaki

Fall

3

Fri. 3

In this course, we will contemplate on what it means to be black American in the early decades of the 21st century, through a close reading of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me, a 2015 best-seller that has been dubbed as “required reading” by Toni Morrison. Written as a letter to the author’s teenaged son about the experiences associated with being black in the United States, Coates’ book claims that the American history has been shaped by white supremacy and racist violence. Through reading Coates’ text along with an excerpt from Baldwin’s 1963 book of essays The Fire Next Time (which inspired Coates to write his book) as well as short story “Sonny’s Blues” (1957), we will 1) appreciate the beauty and precision of the language both authors use, 2) deepen our understanding of the burden of race and racism, and 3) think about the possibility of survival.

 

The class will be divided into small groups, so that the students can comfortably share their opinions, questions, and concerns in English. To warm up, discussion leaders will first make a short presentation on the assigned text so that other students can start making comments and asking questions. To further facilitate the discussion, the students will be allowed to speak in Japanese during the last 30 minutes of each class.

 

文化・文学研究B

413142

Tokyo-Taipei Distance Learning 2

カセラス

KARSERAS, Annette

Fall

3

Mon. 3

Overview

This course uses cross-cultural distance learning human-and-computer technology. It begins with the A-S-K (Awareness-Skills-Knowledge) approach and EQ-SQ-CQ-GQ model. It also describes culture and personality using dimensions and orientations (high-low context, high-low power distance, individualism-collectivism, expressive-reserved, introversion-extroversion, etc).

 

Students research local, every-day ‘emics’ that shed light on objects and concepts that are culturally-specific to modern Tokyo and Tamkang. Students also research STEEP global challenges (Social, Technological, Economic, Environmental, Political) using global data indexes and explore reactions and Caizen opportunities with CCDL partners. This CCDL course aims create an enjoyable working and living socio-physical environment -- within-and-between local, international and global systems -- in the present moment (imminence) and longterm future (infinity).

 

思想文化研究B

413165 / 6250

Christianities: Debates and Perspectives in Christianity

丸山 空大

MARUYAMA Takao

Fall

2

Fri. 2

The course is held in English. Each session consists of two parts: Lecture and Students’ (group-)presentation. In the first few sessions, we are going to see background and birth of Christianity. Then we pick up some debates both inside and outside of Christianity, to see different perspectives in Christianity. Finally, we will discuss about the potential of Christianity in modern (Japanese) society, focusing on some modern Japanese theologians and philosophers that have Christian background.

 

日本文化研究B(日本文学1

413172

Modern and Contemporary Japanese Literature 2

セン

SEN Raj Lakhi

Fall

3

Thu. 3

This course examines the English translations of Japanese literary text such as manifestos, essays, novels, first-person fiction, poetry, women novels, colonial literature and children literature written from Meiji Era to present day literature. By brainstorming various discourses arising from the long accumulated research on the aforesaid topics, students will be able see through and understand the modern and contemporary Japanese literature, society and culture.