List of Subjects in English

School of International and Area Studies

 

l  Introductory Subjects

l  Survey Subjects

l  Elective Subjects

 

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l  Introductory Subjects

Œ»‘㐒ŠE˜_“ό–ε‡UA/B

222003 / 222304G

Introduction to Gender: Cultural Construction of Gender in Comparison

Œά\—’@ƒ~ƒ…ƒQ

IGARASHI Muge

t

Spring

ŒŽ3

Mon. 3

The class is composed of three sections;

1. Construction of Gender

2. Gender in Japan

3. Gender in Comparison

 

Œ»‘㐒ŠE˜_“ό–ε‡VB/A

222007 / 222306G

Introduction to Contemporary Global Problems

ƒ„ƒ“

YANG, Manuel

H

Fall

‰Ξ5

Tue. 5

How do we best understand the world in which we live? Some historians have cautioned against studying contemporary history because we are its byproducts and we might judge it through the lens of presentism, which the OED defines as: guncritical adherence to present-day attitudes, especially the tendency to interpret past events in terms of modern values and concepts.h However, this is all the more reason why we need to find ways of critically historicizing the present; otherwise, the field of the present -- where we live, struggle, and die -- will be left in the hands of policymakers, social scientists, and other so-called experts who adhere uncritically to gpresent-day attitudesh.

 

In this course we will attempt to understand the post-9-11 contemporary world through the prism of war and capitalism, two closely interlinked phenomena that have overwhelmingly dominated the structure of our reality and feelings. In light of military and economic polices under George W. Bush and Barack Obama, how have global and domestic conditions changed and what do they presage for the future of the American empire, now under the regime of Donald Trump? We will study materials published and produced during this period, questioning the gmodern values and conceptsh that have defined the making of our history.

 

Œ»‘㐒ŠE˜_“ό–ε‡TB/A

222002 / 222301G

Introduction to Cultural Studies

–{‹΄@“N–η

MOTOHASHI Tetsuya

“~

Winter

W’†

Intensive

Starting from and introduction of basic concepts of Cultural Studies, we deal with various materials to encourage students to be familialized

with the ways of thinking in Cultural Studies.

 

‘ΫŠΦŒW˜_“ό–εA^‘ΫŠΦŒW˜_

223010 / 220302G

Introduction to International Organizations

“Œ@Žj•F

AZUMA Fumihiko

‰Δ

Summer

W’†

Intensive

This course examines the law, politics and practice of the Worldfs leading international organizations, discussing the legal foundation of the organization and exploring how it operates.

 

 

 

l  Survey Subjects

’nˆζŽΠ‰οŒ€‹†ŠT˜_IIA

321006

Gender, Medicine and Science in Modern Europeh by Do. Emese Lafferton (Lecture by Dr. Emese Lafferton, Central European University)

ˆΙ“Œ@„Žj

ITOH Takashi

‰Δ

Summer

W’†

Intensive

After an introduction to the core concepts of the historiography of the field and a discussion of central tenets of feminist epistemologies of science, the course covers a wide range of topics through fascinating case studies. These focus on themes including:

- interpretations of women and menfs assumed nature/biology (sexuality, fertility and reproduction);

- the social construction of sexual difference (in areas of reproductive biology and anatomy in the 18th -20th centuries);

- the gendered and value-laden medical practices of surgery and gynaecology;

- the gendered forms of madness (hysteria, puerperal insanity, and shell shock);

- the invasion of the female body through modern reproductive technologies;

- bodily and sexual transformation (reconstructive and aesthetic surgery) and bodily enhancement. - the patientfs shifting position in 20th century medical encounters (health social movements: breast cancer and the HIV/AIDS movements)

- the personal experience of health/illness and medical intervention

- racial, class and gender aspects of contemporary cosmetic surgery

- the culturally embedded nature of certain gendered pathologies (such as anorexia and bulimia) demonstrated through careful sociological analysis and with the means of cultural studies

 

Œ»‘㐒ŠE˜_ŠT˜_‡TB/A

322001 / 322301G

Survey of Bob Dylan as U.S. Social History

ƒ„ƒ“

YANG, Manuel

H

Fall

‰Ξ4

Tue. 4

Bob Dylanfs music offers a crucial key to understanding U.S. traditional popular culture and peoplefs history. This is because the desires, poetry, and wisdom of the American people (folk) are compressed in their root music (blues, country, gospel, folk), which influenced him deeply. Moreover, given his pivotal cultural impact worldwide, Dylan can be studied as a cultural index of changing contemporary historical conditions from the 1950s to the present.  

 

How did Dylan come to embody the tradition of American root music and reflect his times, from the 1950s-60s -- when he came of age and became a seminal figure in the counterculture -- to today, when has been canonized as an icon in the pantheon of American literature and culture? In this class, we will look at Dylanfs relationship to his own times and the hidden, often forgotten sources of U.S. traditional popular culture, which shape his work.

 

Dylanfs songs will serve as our point of departure to explore the Cold War, Beat literature, civil rights struggles, labor movement, New Left, popular urban rebellions, Christianity, American power and ideology. What does Dylan and the old blues and folk songs say about crime, disaster, God, and poverty? What do they teach us about love, faith, hope, and being human? And, not least of all, what is Dylanfs relevance to our own history and culture?

 

‘Ϋ‹¦—ΝŠT˜_B/A

323008 / 323308G

Survey of Contemporary World and International Organizations

ŽΒ“c@‰p˜N

SHINODA Hideaki

H

Fall

–Ψ4

Thu. 4

With the instruction by the main instructor, officials of international organizations, mainly United Nations University researchers and staff of Tokyo offices of UN agencies will provide insights from their perspectives. The main coordinator (Shinoda) organizes some review sessions to help participants to develop their understanding.

 

 

 

 

l  Elective Subjects

ƒˆ[ƒƒbƒp’nˆζŒ€‹†A

421001 / 7109

Society and Education in Modern Britain

’†ž@‚³‚β‚©

NAKAGOMI Sayaka

t

Spring

‰Ξ2

Tue. 2

During the Spring Term, lectures are to concentrate on the features during the 19th century. Firstly, lectures will explain the classed and gendered variety within the society and education. Then, detailed lectures are given on changing lives and education of middle class boys, middle class girls and working class children.

 

ƒˆ[ƒƒbƒp’nˆζŒ€‹†A

421009 / 7116

Catalan Culture and Society

ƒ”ƒBƒ‰@ƒ”ƒBƒjƒƒƒX

VILA VINAS, Raquel

t

Spring

‹ΰ2

Fri. 2

In each class we will focus on a topic related to Catalunya. Students will have to do at least one presentation on one of these topics. The teacher will guide and provide the information needed for the presentation.

 

Funded by the Institut Ramon Llull

 

ƒˆ[ƒƒbƒp’nˆζŒ€‹†A

421010 / 7138 / 3244

Portuguese Cultural Heritage and Luso-Brazilian-Japanese Relations 1

ƒ\ƒDƒU

ROCHA De SOUSA, Lucio Manuel

t

Spring

…2

Wed. 2

This course covers a broad range of issues related to European civilization and deals with the process of construction of European and Portuguese social and cultural collective identities, seen as a historical development and as a present transformation. This course also aim to analyze Portugal within a wider international and global perspective and to develop a deep understanding of the inter-relation between the economics, history, politics, language and culture.

 

’†“Œ’nˆζŒ€‹†A

421189

Modernity, Westernization, Orientalism: Ottoman Cultural Transformation in the Long Nineteenth Century (Lecture by Prof. Ethem Eldem, Bogazici University)

¬Ό@‹v’j

KOMATSU Hisao

‰Δ

Summer

W’†

Intensive

From the late 1830s on the Ottoman Empire has engaged in a systematic and top-down transformation of its system along the lines of Westernization. Leaving aside the political, economic and other gconcreteh aspects of this transformation, this course will concentrate on its cultural dimension, illustrated by specific examples.

 

 

ƒˆ[ƒƒbƒp’nˆζŒ€‹†B

421016 / 7110

Society and Education in Contemporary Britain

’†ž@‚³‚β‚©

NAKAGOMI Sayaka

H

Fall

‰Ξ2

Tue. 2

During the Autumn Term, lectures are to concentrate on the features during the 20th century. Firstly, lectures will explain the classed and gendered variety within the society and education and summarise the course contents in the Spring Term. Then, detailed lectures are given on changing lives and education related to the development of primary, secondary and higher education.

 

ƒˆ[ƒƒbƒp’nˆζŒ€‹†B

421020 / 7117

Basque Culture and History

‹g“c@_”ό

YOSHIDA Hiromi

H

Fall

–Ψ5

Thu. 5

This course teaches the student about basic information about Basque society, Basque history, Basque oral literature and so on.

 

ƒˆ[ƒƒbƒp’nˆζŒ€‹†B

421023 / 7139 / 3245

Portuguese Cultural Heritage and Luso-Brazilian-Japanese Relations 2

ƒ\ƒDƒU

ROCHA De SOUSA, Lucio Manuel

H

Fall

…2

Wed. 2

This course covers a broad range of issues related to European civilization and deals with the process of construction of European and Portuguese social and cultural collective identities, seen as a historical development and as a present transformation. This course also aim to analyze Portugal within a wider international and global perspective and to develop a deep understanding of the inter-relation between the economics, history, politics, language and culture.

 

“ŒƒAƒWƒA’nˆζŒ€‹†B1

421108 / 7190 / 3440

Chinafs Economic Reform and Globalization

‘]ͺ@N—Y

SONE Yasuo

H

Fall

ŒŽ5

Mon. 5

The course will cover the following topics: a) the process of Chinafs remarkable economic development, b) Chinafs gState Neoliberalism: its origin, deepening and consolidation, c) Global Financial Crisis and China, and 4)current issues (Party Congress, US-China relationship, Currency policy etc).  The course will be conducted in English.

 

’†“Œ’nˆζŒ€‹†B

421152

Critical Review of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

‹Ρ“c@ˆ€Žq

NISHIKIDA Aiko

H

Fall

‰Ξ4

Tue. 4

This lecture explores the roots and historical development of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from multi-dimensional perspective. Focusing not only on main actors in the field, but also on the opinions of intervening outsiders, opponents and minorities, dismissed different possibilities can be investigated. The critical review may expose deeper sources of the conflict, but at the same time, it could provide alternative ideas and positive prospect for the prolonged conflict.

 

ƒgƒ‰ƒ“ƒXEƒŠ[ƒWƒ‡ƒiƒ‹B

421180 / 7105

Crime and Punishment: A Global History of Prisons

‹{–{@—²Žj

MIYAMOTO Takashi

“~

Winter

W’†

Intensive

Emergence of imprisonment coincided with the time of expansion of colonial powers. However, prison institutions were not simply implanted in the colonies, because there was no gblue-printh of prison in the 19th century. Local experiments were carried out around the world, and different institutions evolved. If the structure of gmodernh prison system that we know now looks similar with each other, it was exactly the result of the exchange of information and techniques during the period. In this course, we will discuss how various ideas of prison were invented and exchanged across national borders during the 19th and 20th centuries.

 

Classes will be consisted of lectures, presentations, and discussions. In every session, one or two students will make a short presentation (about 5-10 minutes). Presentation should summarise the discussion in the last session and articulate the presenterfs opinion. Each student needs to choose a region and analyse related primary sources, and write a term paper (length: between 500-word and 3,000-word) on penal history of the region based on research.

 

Œ»‘γ“ϊ–{Žj˜_A

422002 / 6006 / 7055

Japanfs Post-War Compensation Issues and War and Peace in the 20th Century

‰ͺ“c@‘Χ•½

OKADA Taihei

t

Spring

…3

Wed. 3

This is a lecture class, but from my previous experiences, the number of the registered students will be about 10.  Basically, I will give a lecture in English and conduct the discussion in English.  I really expect active participation from the students.  Some of the documents on these topics are, however, only in Japanese.  In this regard, some of the students (not all) need to understand written Japanese and interpret the documents for the class.  Given gactive learningh as promoted top-down and that I do not really disagree with this policy, there will be reading assignments for each session.  The student needs to summarize the argument and write a question or two regarding the reading.

 

ŽΠ‰οŠwA1

422021 / 7085

Gender and Globalization

ŽRŒϋ@’q”ό

YAMAGUCHI Tomomi

‰Δ

Summer

W’†

Intensive

I envision this class to be a combination of lecture and discussion; the course involves active classroom discussion.  There will be some reading assignments, and you are expected to complete the required readings before classes (more detailed instruction will be given on the first day.) There may be a brief visit to a museum scheduled, which will be announced on the first day of classes. This is a multi-media course, with many in-class showings of films, videos and images required. Regular attendance and participation are required, and active and thoughtful participation in discussion will be rewarded.

 

Note: I may alter parts of this syllabus as the class progresses.  In order to keep up with the changes, please follow the announcements made in class.

 

“NŠw₯ŽΠ‰οŽv‘zB1

422026 / 6007 / 7056

Nationalism and Capitalism in Prewar Japan

ƒ~ƒhƒ‹ƒgƒ“

MIDDLETON, Benjamin

H

Fall

‰Ξ5

Tue. 5

This course will examine the development and transformation of modern Japanese political thought in the Meiji period (1868-1912). Major concerns of this course will be: the characteristics of Japanfs nation building; the formation of imperial nationalism; the development of capitalism and its impact on Japanese society; the structure and transformation of Japanese colonialism; the emergence of pan-Asianism; and war and democracy in modern Japan. We will study these themes from both empirical and theoretical perspectives.

 

This course will be conducted in a colloquium style. The reading load will be about two essays or book chapters per week. Students are expected to do the weekly readings in advance so that they can contribute to discussions. Students will also be required to give three presentations during the term: a presentation on the Iwakura mission (group-work); a field-trip report (group-work); and an individual research presentation based on their term-paper.

 

A basic knowledge of modern Japanese history is recommended, but not required.

 

“NŠw₯ŽΠ‰οŽv‘zB1

422027 / 6009 / 7057

Postcolonialism and Modern Japan

–{‹΄@“N–η

MOTOHASHI Tetsuya

“~

Winter

W’†

Intensive

We cover a wide range of topics from the 150- years-or-so history of Japanese modernity, which has been involved with colonialism particularly against its East-Asian neighbours.

 

‘Ϋ‹@\˜_A

423018 / 7032

Theory and Practice of the United Nations

•x“c@–ƒ—

TOMITA Mari

t

Spring

…2

Wed. 2

(1) The first phase of this course will be basically lectures on the basic knowledge and theories related to the international organizations, especially the United Nations which will be provided by the lecturer. Students are asked to read the provided readings before the lecture. At times, quizzes, short essays alongside a mid term exam will be given. Students are required to actively participate in the discussions during class.

(2) In the second phase of this course, students are to participate in the model United Nations. This is a well-known student activity performed not only in Japan but also around the world. Recently, an international competition was held in Japan for the first time. Students will be split into States and discuss and draft either a resolution or a treaty. Advanced preparation is required by the students. The details will be provided in class.

(3) In the final week, students are to submit a resolution ( or treaty) and an individual report concerning the above group work.

 

‘Ϋ‹@\˜_B

423019 / 7033

The Theory and Practice of the UN Human Rights Institutions

•x“c@–ƒ—

TOMITA Mari

H

Fall

…2

Wed. 2

After introduction to the course, students will be split into groups. They will pick up certain human rights thematic issues and make a presentation. Then, lectures will be given on the practice and theory of the UN human rights institutions. Following the lectures, students will work in groups and chose to be one of the human rights institutions. Depending on the choice, they will either examine State reports or drafting a Human Rights Council report. In the end, students will give a presentation on their reports.

 

 

 

‘Ϋ‹¦—Ν˜_B

423093

Development Cooperation and Japan

’†μ@Š°Ν

NAKAGAWA Hiroaki

H

Fall

‹ΰ3

Fri. 3

Lectures on the development cooperation such as concept, mechanism, role, controversy as well as current situation of developing countries will be given, so that students can deepen their knowledge in many aspects. Case studies which include practical approach and methodology in the poverty reduction or peace building are also given. Outside activities as active learning will be planned in collaboration with JICA.