List of Subjects in English

Global Liberal Arts Subjects

 

 

◆ Spring Quarter

◆ Summer Quarter

◆ Fall Quarter

◆ Winter Quarter

 

◆ Spring Quarter

 

地球社会と共生1A

180011 / 9485

Topics in Globalization and Immigration 2

東 史彦

AZUMA Fumihiko

Spring

5

Fri. 5

After reviewing and refreshing some basic information on globalization and immigration at the beginning, advanced case studies will be held, based on participants’ presentations and discussions.

 

地球社会と共生1A

180013 / 9464

Topics in Intercultural Communication and Miscommunication

森田 京子

MORITA Kyoko

Spring

5

Fri. 5

The class will be very interactive, including activities, simulations, and discussions.

 

キャリアデザイン論1A

180025 / 9439

Topics in Global Business and Leadership

三森 八重子

MITSUMORI Yaeko

Spring

5

Fri. 5

First students learn the definition of innovation and find out innovation around them.

Then students learn different types of innovation and learn policies to promote innovation.

Students also learn entrepreneurs & entrepreneurship and roles of venture companies.

Students also learn mechanisms for creating innovation such as Triple Helix and cluster.

Students then learn evolution of innovation.

 

ことばとコミュニケーションA

180042 / 9461

Topics in Linguistics

河内 一博

KAWACHI Kazuhiro

Spring

5

Thu. 5

In class, we will review introductory papers and complete exercises on data in various languages. Students’ active participation in class is strongly encouraged.

 

文化のおもしろさA1

180055 / 9472

Topics in World Geography 1

マーフィー

MURPHY, Michael

Spring

5

Thu. 5

In this introductory course, students will be introduced to the basic concepts in Geography--the “tools” needed to explore and comprehend the world in which we live. Through acquiring the specialized terminologies of both physical and human geography, students will more easily be able to answer the geographer’s most pressing questions: What?, Where? and Why?  By applying the regional approach, students will acquire specific geographic knowledge, and more importantly will begin to understand how the physical and human geographies of these regions interrelate and shape the possibilities of future cultural and economic development.

 

文化のおもしろさA1

180056

Topics in Religion and Popular Culture in Japan

フリードリック

FRIEDRICH, Daniel

Spring

2

Thu. 2

This course provides an introduction to the study of Japanese popular culture, the religious traditions and world-views that inform that culture through textual, visual and other multi-media sources, including manga and anime.

 

国際社会をひもとくA

180065 / 9450

Topics in Politics and Culture

松永 泰行

MATSUNAGA Yasuyuki

Spring

2

Fri. 2

Broadly speaking, there are two distinct types of explanatory strategies in the social sciences: the methodological individualist and the non-individualist of various kinds. The existing theoretical approaches to culture can similarly be divided into two types. After examining the individualist strategies, we will mostly focus on how different non-individualist approaches may help us better make sense of and explain social and political phenomena through their vantage points of cultural analysis.

 

国際社会をひもとくA

180068 / 9458

Topics in Global Issues 1

ジョンソン

JOHNSON, Stephan

Spring

4

Tue. 4

This course is devoted to the study of contemporary issues of global relevance. Global Issues are increasingly covered in the world media. Examples of issues highlight their breadth and diversity: the debates over nuclear proliferation and Iran; the contested impact of migrants on receiving countries and their respective countries of departure; protest against the World Trade Organisation, and so on which raise the issue of world poverty and dependency and the growing WHO concern with obesity. Students engage with the lecture in both spontaneous and prepared discussions on a wide range of global issues that are topical and motivating.

 

By the end of the course students will have:

1. Students engage in both spontaneous and prepared discussions on a wide range of challenging issues that are topical and motivating.

2. A knowledge and understanding of communication skills.

3. The ability to identify their strengths and weaknesses as students and how they can improve.

4. An ability to communicate ideas/information and summarise material.

5. Demonstrate their understanding in an essay on a contemporary global problem explaining its nature, effects and strategies for redress.

 

国際社会をひもとくA

180069 / 9465

Topics in Media-Government Relationship in Japanese Democracy

ハック

HUQ, Mir Monzurul

Spring

5

Fri. 5

The course will look at major factors that place the Japanese media at the forefront of political and social activities of the country.

 

国際社会をひもとくA

180071 / 9494

Topics in the News Media and Its Role in Global Society

スポサト

SPOSATO, William

Spring

4

Tue. 4

The global news media is often cited as being one of the most influential forces shaping policymaking and public opinion. This course will look at how news reporting affects what we think about the world and how the structure of the industry affects the messages that are delivered. Starting with the Vietnam War of the 1960s, often seen as the first “television war” in history, we will look at major international events and the news coverage that accompanied them, We will also examine recent changes, particularly those stemming from the US presidential election: the attacks on the “mainstream media” and the rise of “fake news.” We will also look at why Facebook is now among the most popular sources of news and the impact this has on what we know.

 

人間と環境A1

180089 / 9469

Topics in Conflict and Immunity: The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster 1

ウィルコックス

WILCOX, Richard

Spring

6

Wed. 6

The learning method consists of an integrated approach whereby students will develop discussion, writing and presentation skills based on DVDs and articles and the teacher’s introductions to topics. Students will develop skills in oral discussion and analysis; academic writing; power point slide presentation techniques. Depending on student numbers, two or three students will offer a powerpoint presentation each week followed by group discussions among students. Their presentation will be based on their final paper, thus one leads directly to the next, and group discussions will help students to refine their theses in a peer reviewed environment.

If students download the “OpenOffice” software for Mac or PC you can easily utilize:

The Student Research Database online to write reports and presentations at:

http://wilcoxrb99.wordpress.com/student-research-database/

Student Outlines are available at:

http://wilcoxrb99.wordpress.com/student-outlines/

Students will produce: in-class notes on other presenters; one powerpoint script of ten minutes; one final paper of 1,200 - 2,000 words in length. Final papers are due on last day of class by hard copy or via email: wilcoxrb.2016@gmail.com

 

人間と環境A1

180090 / 9470

Topics in Environment and Human Life 1

ウィルコックス

WILCOX, Richard

Spring

5

Wed. 5

The learning method consists of an integrated approach whereby students will develop discussion, writing and presentation skills based on DVDs and articles and the teacher’s introductions to topics. Students will develop skills in oral discussion and analysis; academic writing; power point slide presentation techniques.

Depending on student numbers, two or three students will offer a powerpoint presentation each week followed by group discussions among students. Their presentation will be based on their final paper, thus one leads directly to the next, and group discussions will help students to refine their theses in a peer reviewed environment.

If students download the “OpenOffice” software for Mac or PC you can easily utilize:

The Student Research Database online to write reports and presentations at:

http://wilcoxrb99.wordpress.com/student-research-database/

Student Outlines are available at:

http://wilcoxrb99.wordpress.com/student-outlines/

Students will produce: in-class notes on other presenters; one powerpoint script of ten minutes; one final paper of 1,200 - 2,000 words in length. Final papers are due on last day of class by hard copy or via email: wilcoxrb.2016@gmail.com

 

人間と環境A

180091

Topics in Introductory Statistics for Social Sciences

高橋 将宣

TAKAHASHI Masayoshi

Spring

4

Wed. 4

This course is designed to introduce you to concepts that have applications to social sciences. The course does not require a background in calculus, although numbers will be involved. The focus of the course is to help you develop conceptual as well as numerical knowledge in statistics. This will include:

1. Learning what data are and how to present them using graphs and numerical summaries

2. Computing probabilities to understand randomness and variability

3. Working with samples to understand and infer results for the population

4. Examining variables of data, including determining relationships between variables

5. Developing, conducting, and interpreting hypothesis tests.

 

世界の中の日本A

180165 / 9467

Topics in Japanese Religions

松村 一男

MATSUMURA Kazuo

Spring

5

Mon. 5

Through the study of various historical changes in Japanese religions, students are asked to present a paper on a specific theme at the end of the term.

Handouts made by the instructor will be given previously for preparation. Students are expected to read and understand the material for class discussion.

 

世界の中の日本A

180167 / 9459

Topics in Japanese Youth and Popular and Culture

堀口 佐知子

HORIGUCHI Sachiko

Spring

4

Tue. 4

We will start the course by introducing the anthropological perspective and methods, which forms the basis of our framework in making sense of Japanese youth and popular culture. An overview of anthropological studies of youth cultures will then be examined, followed by lectures on the instructor’s study of Japanese youth withdrawal (hikikomori). We will then discuss the following topics in Japanese youth and popular culture: otaku, ‘cool Japan’, gender & the body in popular culture, music & globalization, youth & media, and youth, class & labor.

 

世界の中の日本A

180168 / 9451

Topics in Japanese Films in Comparative Perspective

岡田 昭人

OKADA Akito

Spring

4

Fri. 4

This course is structured around lectures and seminars 90 min. once a week unless stated otherwise in the syllabus.

 

世界の中の日本A

180169 / 9460

Topics in Corporate Governance and Culture in Comparative Perspective 2

市瀬 博基

ICHINOSE Hiroki

Spring

5

Tue. 5

This course will explore cultural dimensions of corporate governance in Japan through the examination of its history, discursive construction of “Japaneseness”, class/gender, and globalization primarily based on some of the field researches of Japanese society and workplace.

 

世界の中の日本A

180172 / 9463

Topics in Japanese Politics

ハック

HUQ, Mir Monzurul

Spring

4

Fri. 4

The course will look at various aspects of Japanese political system, ranging from the constitution of the country to the functioning of local governments and different pressure groups.

 

世界の中の日本A

180174 / 9480

Topics in Tourism Development in Japan

メルヴィン

MELVIN, John

Spring

5

Fri. 5

Contemporary Japanese domestic tourism can be traced back to the religious pilgrimages of earlier centuries, many of which still survive today. More recent forms of tourism have been characterised by a collective and convenient approach yet within this there are a number of distinct and specialised forms of tourism. Tourism is currently experiencing unparalleled growth. An increasingly diverse range of tourists brings opportunities and challenges to tourism managers in the public and private sectors.

 

人間と環境A

180192

Topics in Introductory Sociology

ライチェック

RYCZEK, Matthew

Spring

3

Wed. 3

After a consideration of historical tourism development in Japan this course will examine a range of topical issues, including how Japan can take advantage of the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 and the impact of UNESCO World Heritage Site designation. We will analyse different prefectural marketing campaigns and how Japan is marketed abroad. The course will also consider the factors behind the remarkable recovery of inbound tourism after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake.

 

文化のおもしろさA1

180197

Topics in Japanese Wartime Film and Society

ハウカンプ

HAUKAMP, Iris

Spring

5

Wed. 5

The connections between cinema and war are as intricate as those between film and the society it stands in constant discourse with. This course examines those connections with a critical focus on the Japanese film industry’s position and output during times of armed conflict.

 

The course is structured roughly chronologically from the coinciding emergence of modern warfare and of the modern medium film to the end of the last global war in August 1945, but is centred around various topics, such as empire, censorship, or occupation, that will help us understand the critical tension between concepts of film as art, propaganda vehicle, and profit-making product. We will examine how and why modern war acted as a catalyst for cinema as an intrinsically modern phenomenon and how the cinematic representation of war interacts with the societies involved. Students will work with films as primary texts as well as primary and secondary sources. Over the course of the term students will acquire basic skills in film history research and film studies. In order to understand and get a feeling for cinema at that time as an intrinsically communal experience, we will watch three relevant films in class, followed by discussions. Basic film studies skills will be introduced, practiced, and consolidated by applying it to the various clips used in class and the screenings (all films and clips will be shown with English subtitles). For their assignments, students are required to find and watch relevant films outside of class.

 

 

◆ Summer Quarter

 

地球社会と共生1A

180012 / 9489

Topics in Uncertain Futures: Political, Social, and Economic Challenges in East Asia

フリードリック

FRIEDRICH, Daniel

Summer

集中

Intensive

Drawing upon the works of academics, filmmakers, and writers, this course explores the challenges facing East Asian nations and possible futures.

 

ことばとコミュニケーションA

180043

Topics in Japanese Dialectology

ロング

LONG, Daniel

Summer

集中

Intensive

We will discuss topics like the following:  In what ways do Japanese dialects differ?  Why does dialectal variation exist?  What is the relationship between mainland Japan dialects and the language varieties of Okinawa?  We will also learn techniques for the collection and analysis of dialects.  In the last classes will student will present the topics they have researched.

 

国際社会をひもとくA

180070

Topics in Peace and Conflict Studies from Diverse Perspectives

福田 彩

FUKUDA Aya

Summer

集中

Intensive

This course consists of three components; taught lectures, discussion and writing reports. Scholars in several Asian countries will provide the lectures on the case study through the videoconferencing system. Discussion and Q&A sessions will follow. To understand the lectures more deeply, students are required to write a conflict analysis report in each session during the course.

 

The course will deal with topics below.

1) Intercultural Communication

2) Peace Studies/Peace Education

3) International Relations/International Politics

4) Understanding Peace & Conflict

5) Conflict Resolution

6) Conflict Analysis

7) Asian Conflict Cases

 

Participating universities are as follows. (*Tentative)

Cambodia: Faculty of Social Sciences and International Relations, Paññāsāstra University of Cambodia, Phnom Penh

India: College of Social Work, Nirmala Niketan, Mumbai

Indian administered Kashmir: Center for International Relations, Islamic University of Science and Technology, Awantipora, India

Indonesia: Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta

Pakistan: School of Politics and International Relations, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad

Pakistan administered Kashmir: The Institute of Kashmir Studies, University of Azad Jammu and Kashmir University, Muzaffarabad

Sri Lanka: Department of Political Science, University of Peradeniya, Kandy

 

*Details to be confirmed.

 

 

◆ Fall Quarter

 

地球社会と共生1B

180015 / 9479

Topics in Culture, Power, Identities

森田 京子

MORITA Kyoko

Fall

5

Fri. 5

The class will be very interactive, including group activities, presentations, and discussions.

 

地球社会と共生1B

180016 / 9487

Topics in Globalization and Immigration 1

東 史彦

AZUMA Fumihiko

Fall

5

Fri. 5

This course deals with the present situations and future potentials of globalization and immigration, from viewpoints of international economic law, EU law, international human rights law or the Constitution of Japan.

The European Union (EU) has established an area in which goods, services, capitals and citizens move freely between Member States without internal frontiers.

Thus the EU offers the most advanced “globalization” and immigration model in the World.

This EU model is going to be confronted with the present situations and future directions of globalization and immigration in Japan and in the World.

 

ことばとコミュニケーションB

180045 / 9482

Topics in Introductory Linguistics

市橋 久美子

ICHIHASHI Kumiko

Fall

5

Thu. 5

Language plays an importance role in our cognitive and social activities. In this class, through discussions and exercises regarding familiar topics and questions about human languages, students will learn basic linguistic concepts in order to scientifically understand and describe how languages work.

 

ことばとコミュニケーションB

180046 / 9449

Topics in Speech Communication

岡田 昭人

OKADA Akito

Fall

4

Fri. 4

This course is structured around lectures and seminars 90 min. once a week unless stated otherwise in the syllabus.

 

ことばとコミュニケーションB

180049 / 9491

Topics in Intercultural Communication

コミサロフ 喜美

KOMISAROF Kimi

Fall

5

Wed. 5

In this course, we will explore concepts in intercultural communication not only through readings and lectures, but also activities such as discussions, simulations and case studies.

 

文化のおもしろさB1

180060 / 9492

Topics in World Geography 2

マーフィー

MURPHY, Michael

Fall

5

Thu. 5

In this course we will explore some of the more newsworthy topics in various regions of the world and try to make sense of it all.  What is the meaning of overpopulation?  Why is there ongoing conflict among the citizens of Thailand against the Thai government and what will be the end result of this?  For what reasons have students been protesting against Hong Kong’s officials?  Why do certain groups of people want to secede from those governments that they have long been loyal to?  What evidence is there that climate change is really happening?  These are but a few of the issues we will examine in more detail, and that in which students will have opportunities to research.

 

国際社会をひもとくB

180076 / 9484

Topics in Global Issues 2

ジョンソン

JOHNSON, Stephan

Fall

3

Wed. 3

This course is devoted to the study of contemporary issues of global relevance. Global Issues are increasingly covered in the world media. Examples of issues highlight their breadth and diversity: the debates over nuclear proliferation and Iran; the contested impact of migrants on receiving countries and their respective countries of departure; protest against the World Trade Organisation, and so on which raise the issue of world poverty and dependency and the growing WHO concern with obesity. Students engage with the lecture in both spontaneous and prepared discussions on a wide range of global issues that are topical and motivating.

 

By the end of the course students will have:

1. Students engage in both spontaneous and prepared discussions on a wide range of challenging issues that are topical and motivating.

2. A knowledge and understanding of communication skills.

3. The ability to identify their strengths and weaknesses as students and how they can improve.

4. An ability to communicate ideas/information and summarise material.

5. Demonstrate their understanding in an essay on a contemporary global problem explaining its nature, effects and strategies for redress.

 

国際社会をひもとくB

180077 / 9483

Topics in International Tourism

メルヴィン

MELVIN, John

Fall

5

Fri. 5

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the tourism phenomenon. You will gain an overview of the scale, scope and organisation of the tourism sector and consider the positive and negative impacts of tourism on destinations. We will learn about the development of a destination’s natural, built and cultural resources and how these can be managed and enjoyed sustainably. Students will engage in additional learning opportunities such as group discussions and presentations. As an introductory class, the material covered will be diverse to provide an overview of topics that impact on tourism.

 

国際社会をひもとくB

180078 / 9481

Topics in International Economic Assistance for the Developing World

ハック

HUQ, Mir Monzurul

Fall

5

Fri. 5

the course will focus on the situation of developing countries and asses the impact of economic assistance in the lives of the people of those countries.

 

地域の視点からB

180081

Topics in Modern Japanese History

木村 正美

KIMURA Masami

Fall

2

Fri. 2

This course reviews Japanese history from the mid-1800s to the 1980s.  During this period, Japan developed from a semi-feudal, semi-centralized entity to a unified modern nation-state; but in the process of modernization, Japan transformed itself into an imperialist power outwardly; inwardly, it struggled to deal with two contradictory political and social dictates – the need for authoritarian control and aspirations of liberalism.  After defeat in WWII, Japan evolved through further transformations to become a richer, and more democratic, more liberal society, but the Japanese kept facing the same dilemma and various problems occurring from their continuous search for modernity.  Students will look at interrelated political, socio-economic, and intellectual-cultural developments during these periods and deepen their understanding of critical themes in modern Japanese history.

 

人間と環境B

180096 / 9486

Topics in Conflict and Immunity: The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster 2

ウィルコックス

WILCOX, Richard

Fall

6

Wed. 6

The learning method consists of an integrated approach whereby students will develop discussion, writing and presentation skills based on DVDs and articles and the teacher’s introductions to topics. Students will develop skills in oral discussion and analysis; academic writing; power point slide presentation techniques. Depending on student numbers, two or three students will offer a powerpoint presentation each week followed by group discussions among students. Their presentation will be based on their final paper, thus one leads directly to the next, and group discussions will help students to refine their theses in a peer reviewed environment.

If students download the “OpenOffice” software for Mac or PC you can easily utilize:

The Student Research Database online to write reports and presentations at:

http://wilcoxrb99.wordpress.com/student-research-database/

Student Outlines are available at:

http://wilcoxrb99.wordpress.com/student-outlines/

Students will produce: in-class notes on other presenters; one powerpoint script of ten minutes; one final paper of 1,200 - 2,000 words in length. Final papers are due on last day of class by hard copy or via email: wilcoxrb.2016@gmail.com

 

人間と環境B

180097 / 9490

Topics in Environment and Human Life 2

ウィルコックス

WILCOX, Richard

Fall

5

Wed. 5

The learning method consists of an integrated approach whereby students will develop discussion, writing and presentation skills based on DVDs and articles and the teacher’s introductions to topics. Students will develop skills in oral discussion and analysis; academic writing; power point slide presentation techniques.

Depending on student numbers, two or three students will offer a powerpoint presentation each week followed by group discussions among students. Their presentation will be based on their final paper, thus one leads directly to the next, and group discussions will help students to refine their theses in a peer reviewed environment.

If students download the “OpenOffice” software for Mac or PC you can easily utilize:

The Student Research Database online to write reports and presentations at:

http://wilcoxrb99.wordpress.com/student-research-database/

Student Outlines are available at:

http://wilcoxrb99.wordpress.com/student-outlines/

Students will produce: in-class notes on other presenters; one powerpoint script of ten minutes; one final paper of 1,200 - 2,000 words in length. Final papers are due on last day of class by hard copy or via email: wilcoxrb.2016@gmail.com

 

世界の中の日本B

180179 / 9453

Topics in International Communication Management

荒川 洋平

ARAKAWA Yohei

Fall

4

Mon. 4

Students in each group of students are expected to present the contents of one chapter of the coursebook. In its wake, the instructor will lecture on the chapter including further discussions between students.

 

世界の中の日本B

180180 / 9456

Topics in Modern Japanese Culture and Society from the Perspective of Popular History

友常 勉

TOMOTSUNE Tsutomu

Fall

4

Mon. 4

This course is organized not only by instructor’s lecture, but also by group-working and participants’ presentation and discussion.

 

世界の中の日本B

180183 / 9476

Topics in Corporate Governance and Culture in Comparative Perspective 1

市瀬 博基

ICHINOSE Hiroki

Fall

5

Tue. 5

This course will explore cultural dimensions of corporate governance in Japan through the examination of its history, discursive construction of “Japaneseness”, class/gender, and globalization with an emphasis primarily placed on the formative process of Nihonjin ideology and its influence upon corporate governance in postwar Japan.

 

世界の中の日本B

180184 / 9477

Topics in Fascism and War Memory in Japan

ミドルトン

MIDDLETON, Benjamin

Fall

4

Tue. 4

This course will examine Japan’s experience of fascism and the politics of memory relating to the Asia-Pacific War. Major concerns of this course will be: the analysis of fascism by both Japanese and Western political theorists; the lived experience of fascism in Japan and the colonies; the formation of postwar memory and amnesia of the wartime period; the politics of unresolved issues from the wartime period, such as the comfort women issue and the Yasukuni Shrine issue; the politics of apology; and democracy in modern Japan. We will study these themes from both empirical and theoretical perspectives.

 

This course will be conducted in a seminar style. Students are expected to do the readings in advance each week, and contribute to discussions. Students will also give a mid-term field-trip presentation, a research paper proposal, and an end-of-term presentation on their research paper.

 

A basic knowledge of modern Japanese history is recommended, but not required.

 

世界の中の日本B

180186 / 9478

Topics in Contemporary Japan

ハック

HUQ, Mir Monzurul

Fall

4

Fri. 4

The course will focus on contemporary issues of Japan and analyze each of such pressing topics of present-day Japan.

 

地球社会と共生1B

180193 / 9495

Topics in Migration: Trends and Dynamics

五十嵐 ミュゲ

IGARASHI Muge

Fall

4

Tue. 4

The class covers migration trends in the world with reference to people’s movement across borders. The emphasis of the course is on “people” who migrate.

 

世界の中の日本B

180195

Topics in Formation of Post-War Okinawan Social Movement and Structural Changes in the Trans-Pacific Region

上原 こずえ

UEHARA Kozue

Fall

4

Thu. 4

This class will discuss how the postwar “Okinawan struggle” formed essential historical events on the island and how it was nurtured from people’s experience of trans-Pacific displacement as they lived as migrant workers, soldiers, evacuees or repatriates before, during, and after World War II. By analyzing the collective portrait of the people who have lived through the wartime/postwar period and the structural changes in state, capital, war that they have experienced, we can discover vital connections between the history of Okinawan social movement and global history from below.

 

文化のおもしろさB

180198

Topics in Film Analysis: An Introduction to Film Analysis

ハウカンプ

HAUKAMP, Iris

Fall

5

Wed. 5

This is an introductory class to ‘classical’ film analysis. If you have ever wondered about how films ‘work’, how they convey meaning, and how a two-dimensional moving image on a screen can give you goose bumps, then this class is for you.

We live in an increasingly media-saturated world, dominated by audio-visual media. With regard to TUFS’s international focus, we learn much about other countries by watching films or documentaries set in or about these societies. In order to be active participants--rather than passive receivers--in this discourse, it is important to understand these moving images as constructed and to understand the interplay of their components in making meaning. Studying film, the first audio-visual medium with a history of over 120 years, will give you an excellent basis to do so.

We will work closely with the international standard work “Film Art: An Introduction” (Bordwell and Thompson, 2013, international edition). Over the course of the term, we will cover the principle aspects of film, from understanding film as art and industry, over its narrative form and style, to a final class dedicated to thinking about films in their contexts of production and exhibition (see syllabus). We will also watch and analyse films together in class, in order to practice the concepts already acquired, and to hone your writing about films in order to prepare you for the final film analytical essay.

Classes will include a lecture on the respective chapter for the week, exercises, and discussion time to clarify points and concepts. You are required to work through the respective chapter prior to class, come prepared to ask questions, and deepen your understanding of the topics discussed through the exercises. Each week, there will be a short quiz for you to check your understanding of the topics discussed that week. These tests will be graded and contribute to your overall mark for this course. For your final assignment, you will write an essay, analysing a feature film of your choice.

 

 

◆ Winter Quarter

 

ことばとコミュニケーションB

180050

Topics in Japanese Language Contact, Variation and Change

ロング

LONG, Daniel

Winter

集中

Intensive

Japanese traditional dialects (which we learned about in the class “Language and Communication A”) are not the only source of variation in the language.  Other languages come into contact with Japanese both inside and outside of Japan and we will learn about these situations and the linguistic changes they bring.  Japanese dialects are also in a state of flux and we will learn about the mechanisms behind such change.  In the last two classes, students will make presentations about the topic they have researched.

 

国際社会をひもとくB

180073 / 9462

Topics in Journalism

角地 スヴェンドリニ

KAKUCHI Suvendrini

Winter

集中

Intensive

the course will be a combination of lectures and discussions with an assignment  for students based on field work. The readings will be from newspapers and articles focusing on opinion pieces by international journalists. The course covers the wide Asian region and also highlights issues such as geo politics, development and aid, communication and social issues such as economic disparity, gender inequality, and environment destruction.

 

世界の中の日本B

180176 / 9468

Topics in Japanese Traditional Culture

古瀬 珠水

FURUSE Tamami

Winter

集中

Intensive

In this intensive course, students will concentrate on learning Japanese traditional culture for five days. I will give lectures showing many pictures of art pieces. Students will discuss on pieces related to the subjects provided in the class. On 3rd and 4th days students will give presentation on the topics they research for their active studies. On the 5th day, we visit a museum and have an opportunity to improve each aesthetic appreciation by watching real art pieces. We will meet at the museum (Tokyo National Museum) at 10:30 and dismiss at 15:00 there. The admission fee (410) and the transportation fee are paid by each student.